法律/公民权

NAIROBI, 7 June 2011 (PlusNews) - Epidemiologist Elizabeth Pisani raised eyebrows in 2008 with her book, The Wisdom of Whores, a frank account of her experiences working in the field of HIV/AIDS, from the politics of raising money to conversations in the backstreet brothels of Bangkok. She spoke to IRIN/PlusNews:


Question: Why have HIV prevention efforts failed to curb the spread of the pandemic?

Answer: Prevention has failed for many reasons. One is that we didn't actually start prevention until we had reached such a critical mass of HIV infection that prevention was always going to be difficult. The higher the prevalence in the population, the more effective prevention needs to be just to keep levels constant, let alone lower prevalence.

Globally, we missed some really easy wins when it comes to HIV prevention. One was needle exchange programmes for injecting drug users. Countries which have adopted these policies and adjusted their laws to accommodate them have virtually wiped out HIV among these populations. Unfortunately, a lot of countries have chosen not to do that, including the US and Russia.

Another easy win is providing commercial sex workers with condoms, lubricant and sexually transmitted infections screening; this isn't promoted nearly enough, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, even though the evidence shows that it is fairly easy to achieve very high levels of condom use in commercial sex.

We've been very selective about our use of different HIV prevention methods. Prevention tools must work in four major ways in order for them to succeed - they must work behaviourally, technically, politically and financially - if any one of these things is missing, prevention won't work. Abstinence, for instance, works technically - you are definitely not going to get HIV through sex if you abstain - but behaviourally, studies tell us that abstinence doesn't actually work very well, so telling people to cross their legs for the rest of their lives isn't really going to prevent HIV.


Q: What is the truth within the HIV response that we're ignoring and why?

A: One of the great distortions is the gender thing; we've spent a lot of time acting like it's all about innocent women versus wicked men, when in fact it is impossible for heterosexual transmission to occur in the millions without both sexes being involved. The fact is, women like to get laid too. In sub-Saharan Africa, young women entering marriage are more likely to be the infected partner; more men will infect HIV-negative wives while married, but still, about one-third of new infections in marriage are a result of women infecting their husbands.

This fantasy of the innocent woman has led to some misdirected programming such as women's empowerment programmes and microfinance - both of which are useful, just not in the case of HIV. What should have been done is extremely aggressive promotion of condoms and sexual health services, especially in the context of sex work, much earlier on. We're still not focusing enough on commercial sex.

We've dichotomized HIV epidemics as generalized and concentrated, but even in generalized epidemics, commercial sex work contributes a much higher proportion of new HIV infections [than the general population].

Q: Treatment as prevention - is it the answer to ending the AIDS pandemic?

A: I think treatment is the answer to ending AIDS, but I don't think it is the answer to ending HIV, which is an important distinction. I don't think that it is financially feasible to scale up treatment to the levels it needs to reach in the population in order to end HIV transmission.

For those of us who worship at the altar of the randomized control trial, the recent HPTN 052 study gave us very good evidence that HIV treatment reduces infectiousness, something we've known for a while. But it has only proven this at an individual level; it doesn't tell us about the population level, whether the low viral load can be maintained in the entire population on treatment for the entire lifespan of this population while still ensuring newly infected people - who are highly infectious - are not infecting other people.

In addition, the study excluded people who were not able to adhere to treatment - that meant drunks, people who travelled for work and so on, did not participate in the study. People in the study were in a well-supported trial situation, and we don't know if we can feasibly recreate such a situation in the real world.
This is not to suggest that we shouldn't treat more people, and treat them earlier than we do at the moment. It is bound to reduce the infectiousness of people infected with HIV so it will certainly have an impact, but because treatment allows people to stay alive and sexually active for much longer it won't, in itself, be enough to wipe out new infections.

Q: In your book, Wisdom of Whores, you make the case that in Asia, HIV prevention should focus on high risk groups such as sex workers and IDUs. In East and Southern Africa, where HIV is much more generalized, what is the best way to approach HIV prevention?


A: I genuinely don't know what to do for HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa, and if anyone else has got ideas that really work I don't see them being put into practice. I would predict that incidence is unlikely to fall, and there's a fair chance that it will rise.

On the other hand, if it is possible to provide and keep expanding treatment at a higher CD4 count and sustain it without it undermining the progress of other health and development issues, then HIV may not - eventually - be such a big deal. Members of the 'AIDS mafia' - such as myself - won't say that HIV is not a big deal because we come from the generation of AIDS, when people died, which was a very big deal. But today, if HIV treatment is affordable and available and an HIV-positive person is in a well-managed situation, truthfully, HIV is really not that big a deal.

What I mean is it is not a big deal for an infected individual; it is a huge deal for health systems and tax-payers who have to manage the epidemic, and there is a real threat of drug-resistant strains emerging and taking us right back to the age of AIDS.


Q: In Wisdom of Whores, you say in the past the epidemiological data on HIV was presented in ways that aimed to cause alarm and spur increased AIDS funding. Has this changed - is the data we see today more reflective of the truth about the state of HIV?

A: I think it's getting harder to beat up the statistics the way we used to, and perhaps there has also been a realization that it can be counterproductive to the work you are doing - you might get the money but you can't do what you need to with it.

There is a greater realism compared to the earlier years, and I think there is less distortion even than five years ago. Perhaps lessons are being learned, or perhaps I've just been out of the UN system for too long to see what's going on.

Weblink: http://www.plusnews.org/report.aspx?reportID=92915



流行病学专家 Elizabeth Pisani2008年撰写的《妓女的智慧》(The Wisdom of Whores)一书引起了巨大反响,书中披露了其多年来在艾滋领域工作的经验,内容涵盖了从筹款的政治艺术到在曼谷与按摩院性工作者的交流等。IRIN/PLUS NEWS对她进行采访。

(Q=问题/A=回答)

Q:为什么我们对预防艾滋所作出的努力没有成功的阻止该病毒的流行?

A:失败的原因有很多。其中一个是我们直到艾滋开始大面积感染和传播之时才开始进行预防工作,到那时一切都变得非常困难。如果流行度越高,我们对有效的预防的需求就越大,这样才能保持感染面积不会继续增大。

就全球范围来说,在艾滋预防方面我们错失很多良机。其中一个是针对注射吸毒人员的针头交换项目。实施相关政策、并对法律作出适当调整的国家最终有效地降低了该群体的艾滋感染率。不幸的是,包括美国和俄罗斯在内的很多国家并没有选择这么做。另外一个机会是为有偿性工作者提供安全套、润滑油以及性病检查。尽管证据显示在色情行业中要实现安全套高使用率并非难事,但这项工作并没有很好地开展,特别是在非洲撒哈拉以南地区。

对于不同的艾滋预防方法我们相当的精挑细选。如果要获得成功那么必须得从四个方面来完善艾滋预防方法:行为方面、技术方面、政治方面以及财政方面,如果缺失其中任何一面,那么整个方法都行不通。举例来说,从技术上来说,如果一个人禁欲那么他/她将完全不会感染上艾滋病毒,但是从行为方面考虑,相关研究指出完全禁欲是不太可能发生的,因此如果向公众宣传后半辈子只要夹紧腿做人就能预防艾滋是行不通的。

Q: 在对抗艾滋的过程中我们忽略了什么?为什么?

A:社会性别是整个抗艾过程中最大的误解之一。我们一直把妇女看做无辜的,而男人总是万恶之源,但事实上一个巴掌拍不响,如果没有双方的参与,异性之间的性行为是无法传播的。实际上妇女也可能是传染源。在非洲撒哈拉以南的地区,刚刚结婚的年轻女性更有可能是被感染一方,新婚的男人通常是病毒的传播者,但新增感染者中仍有大约三分之一的案例是妻子传染丈夫。

妇女被当成无辜的受害者这一观念对很多项目设计产生误导,例如针对妇女的赋权项目以及小额贷款项目。这两种项目都非常有用,但对于解决艾滋问题效果并不大。我们更应该花大力气做的是倡导安全套的使用以及提高性健康服务,特别是在色情业,这些工作都应该更早开展。我们对商业性的色情行业仍没有投入应有的关注。

对于艾滋病传染问题,我们总是采取两等分的态度来看待--一般化或集中化,但是即使一般化该问题,新增艾滋感染案例中,比起一般大众来说,性工作者的感染占了更高的比例。

Q:在你的《妓女的智慧》一书中,你提到在亚洲,艾滋预防应该关注高危群体,例如性工作者和注射吸毒人员。在东非和非洲南部,艾滋病毒更是一个全民问题。那么到底什么才是最好的艾滋预防方法?

A:老实说,我并不知道在非洲撒哈拉以南地区要采用何种方法预防艾滋感染,我也并不认为有其他人发现了更好的方法。我预测感染率不但不会降低,反而有上升的可能性。
从另一个方面来说,在对其它健康和发展问题不造成影响的情况下,如果有可能在CD4细胞值更高的时候提供和扩大治疗,那么艾滋病毒最终将不会是什么大事。"AIDS Mafia"的成员,例如我自己,不会随便说"艾滋病毒并不是什么大问题"这样的话,因为我们是经历过艾滋感染爆发高峰期的一代人,病人的死亡可不是一件小事。但是现在如果每个人都有途径接受治疗并能够承担治疗费用,并且每个感染者的病情都能得到很好的控制,那么艾滋病将不再是一个大问题。


Asia Report 翻译

原文链接:

http://www.plusnews.org/report.aspx?reportID=92915

SPEAKING OUT ADVOCACY TOOLKIT

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MSMGF

A Toolkit for MSM-Led HIV and AIDS Advocacy

Speaking Out is an advocacy toolkit created to address the urgent need for men who have sex with men (MSM) everywhere to engage in advocacy locally, nationally, and globally to end the HIV epidemic and promote their human rights. The toolkit equips individuals and organizations with tools and techniques that enable them to become advocates right now, whoever and wherever they happen to be.

Now, more than ever, it is important for our communities to identify our own strengths, weaknesses, and needs, advocating as individuals and collectives for our rights in ways that work for us. MSM communities live and breathe in diverse and complex ways, and we must raise our voices on our own terms, from our respective contexts. That is what this toolkit is all about: ensuring we have the tools we need to become more involved in advocating for our rights, in our homes and schools as well as in governments and international forums.

This toolkit builds on advances made in past toolkits from around the world, with some key differences: (1) it is specifically MSM-focused with exercises and ideas that serve as conduits for the energy and contributions of MSM communities; (2) it is built on the belief that organizations can start where they are, and assumes that the skill sets of individual advocates and organizational maturity of MSM groups are wide-ranging and take time to develop; and (3) it approaches HIV and AIDS from a broad human rights framework, balancing public health and human rights approaches toward addressing MSM community susceptibility to HIV.

We hope you find this toolkit useful!  Please do not hesitate to write to us with any questions or concerns at speakingout@msmgf.org.

 

PDF Download>>

Weblink: http://www.msmgf.org/index.cfm/id/262
MSMGF

    《畅所欲言》是一本针对男男性行为者(MSM)所涉及的倡导工具书,以终结艾滋感染、促进人权发展为目标,帮助该群体有效地开展本土、全国和全球层面的倡导活动。本工具书为倡导者和机构提供实用的工具和技巧,帮助他们能够随时随地立即开展活动。

    比起过去任何时候,当前让社区发现自身的优缺点与需求,并用适合自身的方法开展个人或集体的倡导工作是非常重要的。由于MSM社区内部也非常多样化,因此我们必须从自身的角度和环境出发,用我们自己的方法发出自己的声音。这就是本工具书希望达到的目的:确保我们能够找到适合自己的方法和工具来进行维权倡导工作,无论是在家、学校还是在政府和国际层面。

    这本工具书吸取了全世界已出版的工具书的精华,并在此之上建立了本书的独特性:

(1)本书以MSM为目标群体,为其专门设计相关概念和练习;

(2)我们相信各个MSM组织的发展程度不一,个人所掌握的倡导技能也有所不同,因此本书希望各个群体能够以自身发展的阶段为根据,依次为起点开展工作;

(3)本书在一个宽泛的人权架构下来强调艾滋问题,通过对MSM群体对艾滋的敏感度来平衡对公共卫生与人权问题。

如有任何问题,请发送邮件至:speakingout@msmgf.org.

PDF下载>>

Asia Report 翻译

原文链接: http://www.msmgf.org/index.cfm/id/262


MSMGF


  For its 7th edition, the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia was celebrated on May 17th 2011 with hundreds of events taking place all around the world and on every continent.

  From important statements by international artists, organizations and institutions to mass street protests and publications of groundbreaking reports, the events around the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia have once again displayed the strength, the creativity, the boldness and the diversity of the global fight to end violence, discrimination and stigmatization of people on the ground of their actual or perceived sexual orientation and/or gender identity or expression.


  The IDAHO Committee, the organization promoting the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia worldwide, has received communications about events in over 70 countries across the world. This year, several countries saw their first 'IDAHO' celebrations, countries like Burkina Faso, Fiji or Trinidad and Tobago. The Day was also marked by a strong increase in mobilization levels in several countries, and specifically in the United States of America where many local organizations, for the first time, used the Day as an opportunity for campaigning, mobilization, outreach or lobbying. In other countries, the Day has been confirmed as a major national annual landmark with activities taking place on an ever increasing scale, often uniting hundreds of events and making it to generalized media headlines, such as in Brazil, France, the UK, Turkey, Mexico, Canada, Spain, Italy, etc...


  Across Asia and the Pacific, an increasing number of organizations saw the Day as a useful and relevant opportunity to link their local demands into a global context of mobilization for equal rights. The level of activism has kept increasing in countries like Nepal, China, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, Japan, the Philippines or Thailand. Even in more hostile contexts, such as Indonesia and Bangladesh, the Day has provided space to engage in dialogue, increase awareness, develop acceptance and harness support from allies. Organizations across the region also rallied to call onto the World Health Organization to commit renewed energy to see that national health institutions implement the decision taken in 1990 to stop classifying homosexuality as a mental condition.


  2011 was a special year for Latin America, where on top of the traditional very high level of activism on the Day, the regional 'Cures that Kill' campaign, united dozens of LGBTQI organizations in 14 countries to Human Rights, Women's Rights and other social justice groups to denounce the so called 'conversion therapies' which develop across the region with the insidious proposal to 'cure' sexual orientations or gender identities that do not correspond to 'official' standards. The Cures that Kill campaign generated marches, protests, conferences, artistic events and many other events across these 14 countries.

  In Africa, activists in countries like Uganda, Kenya, Burundi, Cameroon, Nigeria, or Burkina Faso, where both authorities and the social climate are very hostile, displayed immense courage and determination to organize events that included public conferences, radio debates, artistic performances and community gatherings.
In Eastern Europe, the Day was once again marked by severe homophobic and transphobic attitudes, with attacks on activists in Montenegro and Belarus and the announcement of Moscow authorities to once again ban the Pride march.

  But this year's 'IDAHO' was also marked by increased statements of support at the highest levels, with the European Institutions and the United Nations agencies confirming their commitment to making the Day an important annual landmark. At EU level, all institutions, except the Hungarian-chaired Council of the European Union, marked the day with speeches, conferences, exhibitions, etc... The United Nations issued several high level statements, including from Michel Sidibé (UNAIDS), Rebecca Grynspan (UNAIDS) and Navanethem Pillay, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, whose office published a groundbreaking brochure which encapsulated the most significant public declarations against homophobia and Transphobia from the most senior UN officials. Thanks to the amazing work of local activists and the support from the IDAHO Committee with funds from HIVOS and the Arcus foundation, this brochure has been translated, edited and produced in many local languages to support mobilization actions on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia.

  Other groundbreaking publications that were issued on the Day include the update of the ILGA world report on State-sponsored homophobia, the ILGA Europe's Rainbow Map and Index, or the report of the Trans Murder Monitoring Project.

  This year, the Day has also been characterized but a strong presence on social networks, with nearly a hundred pages, groups and events set up specifically for 'IDAHO' actions and events.
Last but not least, the global free daily paper METRO marked the Day in all its 19 national editions, distributed to 17 million people, with a full two-pages on Human rights and LGBT people, an initiative that was part of a much noticed special edition edited by pop star Lady Gaga. Many other international artists tweeted or mentioned the Day on their Facebook pages, or participated in specific IDAHO events, concerts, video projects, fundraising initiatives, etc... Some specific artistic projects, like the 'Walk with Pride' global exhibition were developed, signaling a potential future development of such international initiatives, for which the Day provides a particularly good opportunity.

  With reports from media coverage coming in from 50 countries, the IDAHO Committee estimates that the Day has provided the opportunity to reach out to close to 50 million people worldwide.

  Information and contacts on all the above initiatives, and many more, can be found at www.dayagainsthomophobia.org

Weblink: http://www.msmgf.org/index.cfm/id/11/aid/3685/lang_id/1

Organization: the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia

MSMGF

For its 7th edition, the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia was celebrated on May 17th 2011 with hundreds of events taking place all around the world and on every continent.


From important statements by international artists, organizations and institutions to mass street protests and publications of groundbreaking reports, the events around the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia have once again displayed the strength, the creativity, the boldness and the diversity of the global fight to end violence, discrimination and stigmatization of people on the ground of their actual or perceived sexual orientation and/or gender identity or expression.


The IDAHO Committee, the organization promoting the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia worldwide, has received communications about events in over 70 countries across the world. This year, several countries saw their first 'IDAHO' celebrations, countries like Burkina Faso, Fiji or Trinidad and Tobago. The Day was also marked by a strong increase in mobilization levels in several countries, and specifically in the United States of America where many local organizations, for the first time, used the Day as an opportunity for campaigning, mobilization, outreach or lobbying. In other countries, the Day has been confirmed as a major national annual landmark with activities taking place on an ever increasing scale, often uniting hundreds of events and making it to generalized media headlines, such as in Brazil, France, the UK, Turkey, Mexico, Canada, Spain, Italy, etc...


Across Asia and the Pacific, an increasing number of organizations saw the Day as a useful and relevant opportunity to link their local demands into a global context of mobilization for equal rights. The level of activism has kept increasing in countries like Nepal, China, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, Japan, the Philippines or Thailand. Even in more hostile contexts, such as Indonesia and Bangladesh, the Day has provided space to engage in dialogue, increase awareness, develop acceptance and harness support from allies. Organizations across the region also rallied to call onto the World Health Organization to commit renewed energy to see that national health institutions implement the decision taken in 1990 to stop classifying homosexuality as a mental condition.


2011 was a special year for Latin America, where on top of the traditional very high level of activism on the Day, the regional 'Cures that Kill' campaign, united dozens of LGBTQI organizations in 14 countries to Human Rights, Women's Rights and other social justice groups to denounce the so called 'conversion therapies' which develop across the region with the insidious proposal to 'cure' sexual orientations or gender identities that do not correspond to 'official' standards. The Cures that Kill campaign generated marches, protests, conferences, artistic events and many other events across these 14 countries.


In Africa, activists in countries like Uganda, Kenya, Burundi, Cameroon, Nigeria, or Burkina Faso, where both authorities and the social climate are very hostile, displayed immense courage and determination to organize events that included public conferences, radio debates, artistic performances and community gatherings.
In Eastern Europe, the Day was once again marked by severe homophobic and transphobic attitudes, with attacks on activists in Montenegro and Belarus and the announcement of Moscow authorities to once again ban the Pride march.


But this year's 'IDAHO' was also marked by increased statements of support at the highest levels, with the European Institutions and the United Nations agencies confirming their commitment to making the Day an important annual landmark. At EU level, all institutions, except the Hungarian-chaired Council of the European Union, marked the day with speeches, conferences, exhibitions, etc... The United Nations issued several high level statements, including from Michel Sidibé (UNAIDS), Rebecca Grynspan (UNAIDS) and Navanethem Pillay, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, whose office published a groundbreaking brochure which encapsulated the most significant public declarations against homophobia and Transphobia from the most senior UN officials. Thanks to the amazing work of local activists and the support from the IDAHO Committee with funds from HIVOS and the Arcus foundation, this brochure has been translated, edited and produced in many local languages to support mobilization actions on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia.


Other groundbreaking publications that were issued on the Day include the update of the ILGA world report on State-sponsored homophobia, the ILGA Europe's Rainbow Map and Index, or the report of the Trans Murder Monitoring Project.


This year, the Day has also been characterized but a strong presence on social networks, with nearly a hundred pages, groups and events set up specifically for 'IDAHO' actions and events.
Last but not least, the global free daily paper METRO marked the Day in all its 19 national editions, distributed to 17 million people, with a full two-pages on Human rights and LGBT people, an initiative that was part of a much noticed special edition edited by pop star Lady Gaga. Many other international artists tweeted or mentioned the Day on their Facebook pages, or participated in specific IDAHO events, concerts, video projects, fundraising initiatives, etc... Some specific artistic projects, like the 'Walk with Pride' global exhibition were developed, signaling a potential future development of such international initiatives, for which the Day provides a particularly good opportunity.


With reports from media coverage coming in from 50 countries, the IDAHO Committee estimates that the Day has provided the opportunity to reach out to close to 50 million people worldwide.
Information and contacts on all the above initiatives, and many more, can be found at www.dayagainsthomophobia.org


Weblink: http://www.msmgf.org/index.cfm/id/11/aid/3685/lang_id/1

Organization:IDAHO (the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia)

    法国某大学讲师、黑人与LGBT权利活动家、《恐同字典》首席编辑 Louis-Georges Tin20048月在全球范围内发起国际不再恐惧同志日。同时他呼吁全球对"国际不再恐惧同志日"IDAHO)的国际认同,并提议将这个日子定在5 17日,这一天同时也是世界卫生组织决定将同性恋从精神疾病名单上删除的同一天。2005517,全球24000人以及多个知名国际组织共同签署 了《IDAHO诉求》。2006517IDAHO的全球活动获得数位诺贝尔获奖者、艺术家、学者、非政府组织以及政治家的支持,其中包括大主教杜 图、1998年诺贝尔经济学得主Amartya Sen2004年诺贝尔文学奖得主奥地利诗人Elfriede Jelinek,意大利剧作家Dario Fo 小说家José Saramago、电影明星Merryl Streep,歌手Cindy Lauper, Elton John, David Bowie,语言学家、哲学家Noam Chomsky、女性主义学者Judith Butler,法国哲学家Bernard-Henri Lévy。同年,IDAHO委员会与俄罗斯同志组织Gay Russia共同举办了第一届莫斯科同性恋骄傲盛会(Gay Pride 06)。

     IDAHO
委员会由国际不再恐惧同性恋日(IDAHO)的创始人建立。委员会的目标是让IDAHO成为全球共识,并为倡导者们在各个层面的活动提供空间和 平台。委员会积极争取官方对该国际日的认同,以获得政策和媒体的关注,促进活动的多样性、规模与范围。同时,委员会也支持地方组织针对该国际日发展相关倡 导、教育和公共宣传的策略。



更多信息请登录:www.dayagainsthomophobia.org

AIDSLEX


关于AIDSLEX

 

促进艾滋病感染者和易感人群的权益

对人权的侵害一直阻碍着艾滋病工作的开展,将人们置于感染艾滋病的危险中。艾滋病项目和相关政策应当解决这个问题。女性的从属地位使她们无法要求安全性行 为,以及获得平等的教育和医疗服务。在很多国家,对男男性行为者和性工作者的骚扰和迫害不会遭到惩罚。囚犯无法像其他人一样获得艾滋病相关服务和支持。原 住民和流动人口受到多种歧视,阻碍他们寻求艾滋病相关服务。艾滋感染者在各种环境中都面临着一系列的歧视。总而言之,尽管人们极力倡导以权利为基础的艾滋 病应对,但现实是,我们仍需要做大量的工作去保护感染者和易感人群的权益

 

面对这些挑战,感染者组织、活动家和政策制定者常常需要从法律和人权的角度进行分析,了解相关的研究--以挑战歧视性的法律,抵制不公平或被误读的政策, 通过法律途径保障人民的权利,改变社会不平等,使人们免于艾滋病的威胁,并为感染者提供关怀,维护生存的尊严。这些信息和工具常常很难获得,要么是语言的 障碍,要么是信息的形式或适用性。在一些情况下,关于某一方面的问题可能有很多信息资源,但需要这些信息的人可能没有时间或机会去查找,也无法知道哪些和 他们的工作最相关。

 

AIDSLEX网站

 

AIDSLEX(即艾滋病法律信息交流网)坚持和实践"以权利为基础的艾滋病应对"。这个门户网站是提供给活动家、社区组织、研究者、政策制定者、记者、 医疗工作者的工具,使他们能够简单快捷地获得大量与艾滋病、人权和法律相关的资源。本网站帮助世界各地的人们分享信息、资料和战略,最终促进和保护感染者 和易感人群的权益。

 

AIDSLEX通过以下几种方式提供资源:

 

AIDSLEX 电子图书馆

 

网站的中心部分是电子图书馆,其中有3000多份关于艾滋、人权和法律问题的文献(仍在增加)。文献有一种或多种语言,包括:英语、法语、西班牙语、俄语、汉语和阿拉伯语。数据库的搜索引擎能够保证人们简单快速的获得所需信息。

 

AIDSLEX资源人

 

你是不是想找某方面的专家?AIDSLEX不断增加的资源人名单包括了世界各地从事艾滋法律与人权工作的专家:你可以通过"资源人"查找不同领域的专家--你也可以把你和你的工作领域加入本名单。

 

AIDSLEX也定期在线举办"向专家提问"的栏目,用户可以在一定时间内通过网站向专家嘉宾提出问题。用户也可以浏览以往的栏目内容。

 

AIDSLEX讨论版

 

讨论版是AIDSLEX提供给注册用户的开放论坛。用户可以发起或跟进关于艾滋病和人权的讨论。参与者可以上传相关文献,向他人提问,寻求帮助,分享经验,与全球的人权活动家共同协作。


AIDSLEX  www.aidslex.org

组织:

Iwag Davao--达沃市之光(菲律宾)

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1994年5月,Iwag Davao起初是一个对25名男同性恋者开展艾滋朋辈教育培训的研讨会。该培训受到了男同参与者热烈地回应和积极地参与,之后Iwag Davao有继续为另外25名男同性恋者继续开展培训。在此基础上,1994年10月,Iwag Davao在男同性恋者委员会的组织下正式成立为一家非政府组织。Iwag在宿雾语中意为光,因此Iwag Davao代表了"达沃市之光 "的意思。

该名称也反映了机构的目标:为男同社区赋权,提高他们的社会与经济地位。它象征着引导和解放男同性恋的光芒,使该群体积极参与社区建设,向着自由和团结前进。

网站:http://www.angelfire.com/vamp/iwagdvo/pg2.html


Statement of the first ASEAN Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer (LGBTIQ) People's Caucus

From May 2 to May 5, 2011 over forty lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgenders, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) activists representing 8 out of ten Southeast Asian countries[1] came together in a historic assembly for the ASEAN People's Forum to tell their governments that the status quo is not acceptable and that the recognition, promotion, and protection of LGBTIQ rights is long overdue.

ASEAN is the cradle of the Yogyakarta Principles[2], a landmark articulation of internationally recognized human rights instruments in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI), and yet LGBTIQs in ASEAN countries consistently face criminalization, persecution, discrimination and abuse because of who they are.

In Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, and Burma, authorities arrest, detain and persecute individuals because of colonial laws that criminalize their sexual orientation or gender identity. In other ASEAN countries, certain laws are abused with impunity to harass or persecute individuals whose sexuality or gender is deemed unacceptable, immoral, or unnatural: anti-prostitution, anti-trafficking, or anti-pornography laws in Indonesia and the Philippines are applied to conduct illegal raids in gay establishments or to nab transgenders, oftentimes subjecting them to humiliation and extortion. The anti-kidnapping law in the Philippines is likewise used to forcibly break apart lesbian couples living under consensual and legitimate relationships.

We are part of the people of ASEAN, and yet across the region we are treated as criminals and as second-class citizens.

Instead of representing the interests of all citizens, many governments and state institutions become instruments of religious and sectarian prejudice. In Surabaya, Indonesia, the police was complicit in an attack by an intolerant religious group against the participants of an international LGBTIQ conference.

A climate of stigma and discrimination prevails in most, if not all, ASEAN countries. From Vietnam to Brunei Darussalam, social stigma persists. Sexual orientations and gender identities outside heterosexuality and patriarchal gender norms are considered as a sickness that can be corrected through rape, reparative camps like in Besut, Malaysia, only one of several camps in the country, and other damaging psychosocial measures.

Access to basic services, from health to education, is denied on the basis of one's presumed or actual sexual orientation or gender identity. Stigma has contributed to the steep rise in HIV infection among at-risk populations like men who have sex with men and transgenders, making it difficult for preventive interventions to reach them.

But our movements are growing. In various parts of the region, pride is unraveling and we will not take exclusion sitting down. LGBTIQ activists and organizations continue to actively engage government institutions, mass media, and civil society for equal rights and basic fairness. It is in this spirit of pride and dignity that we are reclaiming our rightful space in our respective countries and demand our governments to:

Immediately repeal laws that directly and indirectly criminalize SOGI, recognize LGBTIQ rights as human rights, and harmonize national laws, policies and practices with the Yogyakarta Principles.

Establish national level mechanisms and review existing regional human rights instruments (e.g. AICHR, ACWC) to include the promotion and protection of the equal rights of all people regardless of SOGI with the active engagement of the LGBTIQ community.

Depathologize SOGI and promote psychosocial well being of people of diverse SOGI in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) standards, and ensure equal access to health and social services.

We will not be silenced by prejudice. For a people-centered ASEAN, LGBTIQ rights now!

The ASEAN LGBTIQ Caucus:
1.    Arus Pelangi (Indonesia)
2.    Ardhanary Institute (Indonesia)
3.    APTN/ APNSW (Malaysia)
4.    EFFORT (Indonesia)
5.    Gessang (Indonesia)
6.    ISEE (Vietnam)
7.    Youth dream (Vietnam)
8.    Gaya Nusantara (Indonesia)
9.    Violet Grey (Indonesia)
10. IWAMA (Indonesia)
11. Seksualiti Merdeka (Malaysia)
12. Justice for Sisters (Malaysia)
13. Human Rights education institute of Burma (Burma)
14. PLU-Satu Hati (Indonesia)
15. ICS (Vietnam)
16. Lesbian Activism Project, Inc. (Philippines)
17. Kipas Makasar (Indonesia)
18. Perempuan Mahardhika (Indonesia)
19. Galaya Club (Thailand)
20. SOGI Foundation (Thailand)
21. Rainbow Community Kampuchea (Cambodia)
22. GALANG (Philippines)
23. Oogachaga (Singapore)
24. Her lounge (Indonesia)
25. FKWI (Indonesia)
26. Komunitas Sehati Makasar (Indonesia)
27. For SOGI (Thailand)
28. GWL - Ina (Indonesia)
29. Q-munity (Indonesia)
30. Akbayan (Philippines)
31. TLF Share Collective (Philippines)
Supported by:
32. IGLHRC - Asia & the Pacific Island Program

Weblink:http://www.iglhrc.org/cgi-bin/iowa/article/takeaction/partners/1381.html


 

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